Cropped GFX File

Updated: Feb 25

Time to see how far I can go with a cropped GFX file. One of the stand out features I noticed when first inspecting my GFX files is the incredible resolution. The second thing that hits you is the huge dynamic range. You really can push the shadow tones to an amazing degree.


Having been used to processing APS-C Fujifilm X files, this is going to take a bit of getting used to. The GFX sensor is 2.34 times bigger than the Fujifilm APS-C sensor so that is a big jump in image quality. Of course in time I am sure I will take all of this post processing greatness for granted. But in the meantime it is a case of seeing how far I can exploit the extra pixels creatively.


This is Cosmo. I took this quick picture of him whilst out for a walk. I took the shot with the lens wide open at F4. Something I have discovered to my cost with the larger format is that focussing is far more critical compared to using smaller image sensors. Cosmo's eyes are sharp but the focus is starting to fall off slightly at the front of his nose so I should have maybe stopped down a stop. This is more noticeable in the second cropped image but I think it is acceptable.The second image has been cropped in by nearly a third of it's original size with still plenty of detail in the photograph.

Full size uncropped GFX original image size 8256 x 6192

Here is the cropped in version which is just under a third of the size of the original.

Cropped GFX image 3090 x 2318 after crop

Other advantages of the bigger sensor are of course bigger pixels allowing for greater low light gathering, greater detail, colour depth and overall quality. Apart from any carefully composed full frame Landscape images I can see that cropping my GFX image files could well become a regular stage in my workflow. Any thoughts?

If you can add more information from your own practical experience and knowledge please do - I would love to hear from you

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